Forum Posts

Liz Loveland
Dec 27, 2020
In Course Discussion Board
There have been two pieces published in the last week (one in the Guardian newspaper and the other by the Getty Museum) claiming that European artists' shift to often depicting one of the Three Magi as Black was because of the rise of the European chattel slave trade. An acquaintance of mine has published a rebuttal using medieval and Renaissance works, including images of several works of art. I thought some of you might be interested. https://imageoftheblackinlondongalleries.weebly.com/blog/the-black-magus-a-slave
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Liz Loveland
Dec 11, 2020
In Course Discussion Board
The Boston Early Music Festival will be livestreaming primarily Renaissance music by the the well-known Renaissance-focused group Tallis Scholars in a little over an hour at 8pm EST on their YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5Z_Xo4COgQ The recording will be available until Christmas Day. The program for the event is at https://bemf.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BEMF_Tallis_Program.pdf and includes a little information on the composer of the first song they will be singing, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (ca. 1525–1594), and his song they chose, "Magnificat primi toni." It also briefly discusses the Italian connections of a couple of the other featured Renaissance composers. (I realize that I am likely posting this too late for anyone else to be able to watch the livestream, but I had some problems posting to the board today. Sorry.)
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Liz Loveland
Nov 29, 2020
In Course Discussion Board
Hi everyone! I realize this is off-topic for purposes of this class, but it seemed from your interests that some of you might be interested in viewing these. This weekend the Boston Early Music Festival virtually premiered three recordings of the story of Orpheus that according to them will be available until December 10th. The most relevant one is Monteverdi's Orfeo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZ5X3RJ8R-4 They also premiered: Campra's Orfeo nell'Inferi from Le Carnaval de Venise, in which the French poke fun at Italian baroque opera: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGoe1ykNEFg Charpentier's La Descente d'Orphée aux Enfers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KyUmmaxwOOw You can see English-language subtitles on all of them by hitting the "CC" (closed captioning) button on YouTube. And you can download the programs and librettos at https://bemf.org/concert-season/boston-concerts/looking-back-at-orpheus/ (scroll down nearly to the bottom of the page). The programs include short essays on the works. Like Elaine's public talks, donations are requested but not required.
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Liz Loveland
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